Skip to main content

Personal Librarian Program: Home

Find Your Librarian

Why a Personal Librarian Program?

Students arrive to college with varying levels of experience navigating libraries and may have little experience with academic libraries, in particular. Research shows that when students use the library they have greater academic success and are retained at a higher rate than non-library users (Soria, Fransen, & Nackerud, 2014, p. 89).  The Personal Librarian Program is an outreach effort by Concordia University librarians to reduce student library anxiety, facilitate library usage, and create long lasting connections with students so students learn research skills necessary to succeed in their coursework. 

 

Welcome to a universe of information postcard

What is it?

Each fall semester faculty librarians liase with Concordia Commitment (LDR 198) classes to provide a personal point of contact for students and help them feel more comfortable asking for assistance.

We hope that by the end of fall semester, freshman and transfer students will…

  • Know that helping with research is part of a librarian’s job, that they can contact a librarian to help with research, and how to contact a librarian
  • Feel that librarians are approachable and friendly

The program consists of:

  • Sending welcome postcards to incoming first-year students who have registered or made deposits.
  • Visiting students in Commitment courses during the fall. Students meet the librarian assigned to their section and are given their contact information.
  • Emailing support and library tips to students throughout the semester. Emails are tailored to assignments freshmen typically have.
  • Providing a Commitment seminar during fall semester that includes time for students to meet their personal librarian, food, a behind-the-scenes tour, and brief instruction about using the library.

Libraries and Student Success

The following studies make the connection between library use and academic success and/or student retention:

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2017). Academic library impact on student learning and success: Findings from assessment in action team projects. Prepared by Karen Brown with contributions by Kara L. Malenfant. Chicago, IL: Author. Retrieved from http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/

Currier, M. L., & Wilhelm, C. (2017). Examining the case of an academic library’s student-focused, patron-satisfaction approach to organizational transformation for student retention. Library Leadership & Management, 31(3), 1-39.

Haddow, G. (2013). Academic library use and student retention: A quantitative analysis. Library & Information Science Research, 35, 127-136. doi:10.1016/j.lisr.2012.12.002

Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2014). Stacks, serials, search engines, and students’ success: First-year undergraduate students’ library use, academic achievement, and retention. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40, 84-91. doi:10.1016.j.acalib.2013.12.002

Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2017). The impact of academic library resources on undergraduates’ degree completion. College and Research Libraries, 78(6), 812-823. doi:10.5860/crl.78.6.812

/**/